Why do I Shoot progressive from Alister Chapman

Categories: Miscellaneous No Comments

XDCAM USER

I shoot all my own material as Progressive. About the only time I shoot interlace is when shooting airshows where the client specifies interlace, even that looks like it will change to P next year.

Interlace really is a hangover from the past where there simply wasn’t the bandwidth to broadcast full resolution (SD) progressive frames, so the compromise that is interlace was developed to split the frame into 2 half’s, transmitting one after the other. This enabled broadcaster to fit SD pictures into narrower bandwidth than would have been possible for progressive  analogue broadcast. These days with most display technologies centering around progressive scanning I’m not convinced that interlace is the way to shoot. Obviously if your client insists on interlace then that’s what you must deliver.

I supply hundreds of hours of footage to broadcasters, museums and corporate production companies around the world. I have been shooting progressive since 2004. Often I deliver the material recorded as interlace, but containing progressive images. Not once has that caused me a problem. As I write this I am converting some 1920×1080 25P footage to 1920×1080 60i for delivery to NBC. If I had shot 50i that conversion would be very difficult to do and to make look good. Software standards conversion of interlace material is troublesome to say the least. It is so much easier to start of with one frame rate of P and convert to another frame rate P or I. If you start with I then you immediately have a resolution drop if you shoot with a video camera because the fields are created by using overlapping line pairs from the sensor to prevent twitter an aliasing. Converting that already resolution compromised footage to progressive will almost certainly result in a further resolution drop as you will need to do some form of de-interlace procedure. On a big screen that drop in resolution is very noticeable. Converting from P to I on the other hand has none of these issues and frame rate conversions from P to P are easy.

More and more video is ending up on the web or being delivered to computers, so for this progressive is essential. Interlace on computer screens usually looks terrible. In the future it seems likely that television broadcasting as we know it will be replaced with video served over the internet or some other data pipe such as direct to home fiber-optic, again this will almost certainly require progressive material.

More and more broadcasters are now insisting on progressive delivery of HD material, especially for documentary, drama and other high end productions. Often this is because international distribution of progressive is so much easier and the quality better. Sure 25P is not ideal, 50P would be better. But working with progressive material is so much easier than working with interlace.

http://www.xdcam-user.com/?p=239

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

A Day with Snow Leopard and FCP-7.0.1 coming soon…

Categories: Miscellaneous No Comments

Day-with-SL-&-FCP-7

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

AJA io HD Drivers finally available V7.1

Categories: Miscellaneous 1 Comment

Apple-&-AJA

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

The New iMac from Apple

Categories: Miscellaneous 1 Comment

New-iMac-V2

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

HD Warrior Camcorder announcement of 2009 … Sony PMW-350K

Categories: Miscellaneous 2 Comments

camcorder-announcement-of-2009

So how did I come to that decision after all I have not even seen the camcorder !  I take Alister Chapmans word as gospel on this camcorder, although Alister is a Sony man his reputation as a Director of Photography (DoP) is on the line with this camcorder. Alister reckons the PMW-350 is a lot quieter than the EX-3 which up till now was the GOLD standard HD camcorder that all other camcorders in that price bracket were judged by.

2/3″ chipset is mindblowing, this camera take my word for it will be taken on by broadcast companies who are using the EX-3 at the moment with 2/3″ lens adaptors.

As I have said before and will say again Sony are trailblazers when it comes to video gear, their commitment to giving you the best quality at the cost of higher spec camcorders in their range is unsurpassed and that’s why I give the Sony PMW-350 the HD Warrior Camcorder announcement of 2009 award.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

“After the dust settles” Sony PMW-350K HD Warrior camcorder of 2009

Categories: Miscellaneous No Comments

After-dust-settles

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

“Burning Questions” mini interview with Alister Chapman about the new Sony kit

Categories: Miscellaneous No Comments

Chapman-interview-v3

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Sony PMW-EX1R

Categories: Miscellaneous 1 Comment

Sony-PMW-EX1R

The reason this camera was posted last was because I was trying to get some information on the “R” part of the part number…I initially thought this camcorder had been blesed with the Exmor “R” chipset which would have made it very appealing…the only addition which may be of some use is the ability to film in SD mode.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Sony PMW-350K “The Bigger Picture”

Categories: Miscellaneous No Comments

Sony-PMW-350K-poster

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Sony PMW-350K TechSpecs (Expected Price £14,375 incl. vat.)

Categories: Miscellaneous 2 Comments

PMW-350K(img1)

Mass

3.2 kg (7 lb 1 oz) (body)
6.3 kg (13 lb 14 oz) (with LCD VF, AF lens, Mic, BP-GL95)

Dimension (W x H x D)

124 x 269 x 332 mm (5 x 10 5/8 x 13 1/8 inches) without projection

Power requirements

DC 12 V

Power consumption

Approx. 18 W (with LCD VF, AF lens, mic, while recording)
Approx. 15 W (body while recording)

Operating temperature

0 °C to 40 °C (32 °F to 104 °F)

Storage temperature

-20 °C to +60 °C (-4°F to +140 °F)

Battery operating time

Approx. 310 min with BP-GL95 battery

Recording format

Video:
MPEG-2 Long GOP
HQ mode: VBR, maximum bit rate: 35 Mb/s, MPEG-2 MP@HL
SP mode: CBR, 25 Mb/s, MPEG-2 MP@H-14
SD mode: DVCAM (Option)

Audio:
HD mode: Linear PCM (4ch, 16-bit, 48-kHz)
SD mode: Linear PCM (2ch, 16-bit, 48-kHz)

Recording frame rate

NTSC area:
HD HQ mode: 1920 x 1080/59.94i, 29.97p, 23.98p, 1440 x 1080/59.94i, 29.97p, 23.98p, 1280 x 720/59.94p, 29.97p, 23.98p
HD SP mode: 1440 x 1080/59.94i, 23.98p
SD mode: 720 x 480/59.94i, 29.97p (Option)

PAL area:
HD HQ mode: 1920 x 1080/50i, 25p, 1440 x 1080/50i, 25p, 1280 x 720/50p, 25p
HD SP mode: 1440 x 1080/50i
SD mode: 720 x 576/50i, 25p (Option)

Recording/Playback time

HQ Mode:
Approx. 100 min with SBP-32 (32 GB) memory card*
Approx. 50 min with SBP-16 (16 GB) memory card
Approx. 25 min with SBP-8 (8 GB) memory card

SP/SD Mode: (SD:Option)
Approx. 140 min with SBP-32 (32 GB) memory card*
Approx. 70 min with SBP-16 (16 GB) memory card
Approx. 35 min with SBP-8 (8 GB) memory card

Lens

Lens mount

2/3-type SONY bayonet

Zoom ratio

16x (optical), servo/manual (AF lens for PMW-350K)

Focal length

f = 8 mm to 128 mm (equivalent to 31.5 mm to 503 mm on 35 mm lens)

Iris

F1.9 to F16 and Close, auto/manual selectable

Focus

AF/MF/Full MF selectable, 800 mm to infinity (MACRO OFF)
50 mm to infinity (MACRO ON)

Image stabilizer

N/A

Filter diameter

M82 mm, pitch 0.75 mm (on lens)

Camera Section

Imaging device

3-chip 2/3-inch type Exmor Full HD CMOS

Effective picture elements

1920 (H) x 1080 (V)

Optical system

F1.4 prism system

Built-in optical filters

1: Clear, 2: 1/4ND, 3: 1/16ND, 4: 1/64ND

Sensitivity (2000 lx, 89.9% reflectance)

F12 (typical) (1920 x 1080/59.94i mode), F13 (typical) (1920 x 1080/50i mode)

Minimum illumination

0.006 lx (typical) (1920 x 1080/59.94i mode, F1.9, +42 dB gain, with 64-frame accumulation)

S/N ratio

59 dB (Y) (typical) (Noise Suppression mode ON)

Horizontal rezolution

1,000 TV lines or more (1920 x 1080i mode)

Shutter speed

1/60 sec to 1/2,000 sec + ECS

Slow Shutter (SLS)

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 16, 32, and 64-frame accumulation

Slow & Quick Motion function

720p:
Selectable from 1 fps to 60 fps as recording frame rate

1080p:
Selectable from 1 fps to 30 fps as recording frame rate

White balance

Preset (3,200 K), Memory A, Memory B/ATW

Gain

-3, 0, 3 ,6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 dB

Inputs/Outputs

Audio input

XLR-type 3-pin (female) (x2), line/mic/mic +48 V selectable

Composite output

BNC (x1), NTSC or PAL, COMPONENT Y

S-Video output

N/A

Audio output

XLR-type 5-pin

Component output

N/A

SDI output

BNC (x1), HD-SDI/SD-SDI selectable

i.LINK

IEEE 1394, 6-pin (x1), HDV (HDV 1080i)/DVCAM stream input/output, S400

Timecode input

BNC (x1)

Timecode output

BNC (x1)

Genlock input

BNC (x1)

USB

Device Type B (x1)

Headphone output

Stereo mini-jack (x1)

Speaker output

Monaural

DC input

XLR-type 4-pin

DC output

4-pin

Remote

8-pin

Lens remote

12-pin

Mic

XLR-type 5-pin

HDMI output

19-pin

VF

26-pin (LCD VF), 20-pin (DXF)

Wireless receiver IN

D-Sub 15-pin

Monitoring

Viewfinder

3.5-inch* type colour LCD monitor: approx. 921,000 effective pixels, 640 (H) x 3 (RGB) x 480 (V), 16:9, hybrid type
*Viewable area measured diagonally

Built-in LCD monitor

Black & white LCD (Audio level, TC, battery and media remaining capacity)

Media

Type

ExpressCard/34 slot (x2)

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next

%d bloggers like this: