RED Digital Weapon with 8K Helium sensor by Vincent Laforet

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This is why 8K matters, Vincent Laforet tells us why he has switched over to the RED Weapon with 8K Helium sensor. At over $49.5K dollars this technology is not cheap but when you are at the top of your trade price is no option.

Vincent Laforet is among the most influential pioneers working in contemporary photography and film today. His unique commercials for such well-known brands as Apple, Nike, General Electric, CNN, and Canon, and his groundbreaking photography for magazines such as National Geographic, Vanity Fair, and Sports Illustrated, to name just a few, cover a broad spectrum of subjects and narratives. Yet a common thread runs through his work: It always features cutting-edge technologies that make the photographs and films inventive, iconic and unforgettable.

A few weeks ago, a portrait I shot got a bit of attention from the press at the Cinegear convention that takes place every year at Paramount Studios.

Here’s a link to the JPEG of the 8K image which I hope doesn’t blow up my account with DropBox here.

Cinegear is an event that brings together all of the leading tech for the cinema industry – it’s a wonderful event to attend and I can’t recommend it enough.

The Key here is that a STILL image garnered attention at a CINEMA event …   why, well obviously it was shot on a motion camera at 8K – in this case the RED WEAPON 8K camera which is capable of capturing 36 megapixel stills in full RAW up to 60 times per second.     And when you slow down to look at the quality of this image… it kind of speaks to the future of where we all are headed.

And don’t forget the RED 8K Weapon is capable of recording 30 seconds back in time … that’s 1800 full RAW 36 MP frames at the touch of a button … think about it.

And yes – you can use your Canon, Leica, Nikon and the majority of cinema lenses on this camera to pursue your visual dreams – whether they be in motion or still … why choose if you can get both?    And you can control every function on this camera literally with you iPhone as well with apps like FoolControl…

While many will see the cost of a RED system as initially out of their reach, I would remind you of the 2 megapixel Kodak camera that shot 2 frames per second in 1999 …  and of the iPhone that came out almost 10 years ago that obliterated that camera in many ways 7 years later.   It’s just a matter of time before this technology makes it way into all of our hands as prices and mass adoption takes hold.   And there are already plenty of much more affordable entry level systems that RED provides – I call them the gateway drugs to be perfectly honest.  Once you see the quality coming off of these sensors … just as with still cameras you want more an more Megapixels and frames per second.  FULL STOP.

While we can’t readily imagine a RED camera being sold on the shelves of Best Buy just yet … give it time.    Mark my words and call me crazy … but the tech will definitely make its way onto consumer shelves much more quickly than many of us are anticipating.   History has already proven this trend, and cycles are only speeding up…

The Convergence of Stills & Motion at 8K from Vincent Laforet on Vimeo.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Space Crate for rent

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SpaceCrate™ is a permanent or temporary, professional-spec creative space designed for a variety of applications in Media & Entertainment, for production and post.

Prefabricated for cost effective, simple deployment and instant use, almost anywhere in the world, SpaceCrate is constructed within the standard ISO-spec 20 foot Shipping Container and is every bit as modular, secure, transportable and recyclable.

Stunning interior design, studio-grade isolation and acoustics, power prep and air conditioning are standard.

 

www.spacecrate.co.uk

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Using the new Canon C700 with flare…Brilliant video

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The task was to capture the spectacular airshow by SWISS and Patrouille Suisse performed during the World Ski Championship 2017 in St. Moritz. The target audience was very clear too: People fascinated by such an airshow. Our approach: To focus on the beauty of such a show. Moments, instead of action.
SWISS is the official airline of the World Ski Championship 2017. The formation flight was one of many highlights during the two weeks in St. Moritz.
We had two cameras on the ground, one inside the C Series cabin, a few GoPro’s in the cockpit and a few with the Patrouille Suisse Team. We shot four days but weather reduced our chances to two days. The edit was done in premiere with a roundtrip for grading in Resolve.
Canon Switzerland supported us with lenses and the new C700. It worked flawlessly. Just like a more powerful (and much heavier) C300 Mark II. We’re looking forward to try the RAW recording soon. This time we shot on C-Log2 with Canon’s MXF.

SWISS C SERIES – PATROUILLE SUISSE AIRSHOW from LAUSCHSICHT on Vimeo.

SWISS C SERIES – PATROUILLE SUISSE AIRSHOW | PRODUCTION IMPRESSIONS from LAUSCHSICHT on Vimeo.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

ADVERT…Production Gear at stand 536

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If you go to the Media Production Show today why not call in at Production Gear’s stand 536

Simon with a pre production Panasonic EVA-1

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Build your own cinema camera…the Axiom

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As a proof of concept we created the AXIOM Alpha in 2013. This was an FPGA and CPU combination based on the Zedboard, and by using off the shelf components we interfaced the Super35 4K image sensor with an HDMI linked external recorder. The Alpha featured a Nikon F-Mount and was encapsulated in a transparent, laser-cut enclosure to offer the internal components some protection.

It was mainly intended to prove that, in the simplest way possible, everything could be made to work, but the system worked so well in fact that it’s still used by the community for workshops and shooting small projects today.

One such workshop took place at the 37th Clermont Ferrand Short Film Festival where students and film makers got to explore and utilize the camera first hand.

Other projects involved attaching the AXIOM Alpha to a cable camera at Schloss Schönbrunn in Vienna or shooting Macro Shots of Insects. Essentially though, the AXIOM Alpha was used to gather feedback in typical shooting scenarios so that ideas could be incorporated into a future, more modular, kit version aimed at developers and early adopters – AXIOM Beta I, but this prototype was the culmination of years of cooperation dating back to 2006.

4K raw image (Photographer: Rainer Ressmann, processed by A1ex from Magic Lantern)

Here is an interview by Johnnie Behiri from Cinema 5D with Sebastian Pichelhofer from the Axiom project. Web site here https://www.apertus.org

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Panasonic card capable of recording 400Mbps…64G £350

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Ideal for indie filmmakers, the EVA1 records to readily-available, lower-cost SD cards. The camera can record in several formats and compression rates, and offers up to 10-bit 4:2:2, even in 4K. For high-speed capture, the EVA1 offers 2K up to 240-fps. In terms of bitrates, you can record up to 400-Mbps for robust recording. A complete breakdown of recording formats will be available at the time of the EVA1’s release.

The new Panasonic EVA-1 with the capability of taking the new faster V90 SDXC cards. I first came across these new SDXC cards on the Panasonic PX270 using the newly designed micro P2 cards.

So what are the extra row pins for…

The Secure Digital Card was developed as a better version of the Multimedia Card. It’s 50% thicker (so it won’t fit in an MMC slot) and has nine electrical contacts instead of seven.

Furthermore, 4K video is almost becoming routine, along with higher frame rates (60fps or even 120fps). So fast writing is important.

First there’s Speed Class. This is marked by a number in a circle with a gap on the right hand side, like a stylised capital “C”. This one’s pretty straightforward. The normal Classes are 2, 4, 6 and 10, and in each case this matches the number of megabytes per second for write speed.

For higher speeds you have to look to UHS Speed Class. That uses a number sitting in a kind of bucket, like a squared off capital “U”. That one denotes the number of tens of MB/s. So UHS Speed Class 1 is a write speed of at least 10MB/s, and UHS Speed Class 3 is 30MB/s.

Cameras with a 4K video capability typically insist on a UHS Speed Class 3 card before they’ll operate at that frame rate. Others that capture full HD at high bitrates (some work at up to 200Mbps) may also require that kind of card.

Meanwhile, a new rating has appeared, this is called Video Speed Class. So far there appear to be ratings of V6, (the V is, of course, stylised), V10, V30, V60 and V90. And, yes, the number equals the write speed in MB/s. So V6 equals C6, V10 equals C10 equals U1. V30 equals U3.

UHS-II is even faster, but this one has physically changed. For the first time since SD was first introduced in 1999, it has new electrical contacts. The eight additional contacts are in a separate row below the common ones, so they don’t interfere with older card readers. I’ve used such cards with a years-old reader that came with an SDHC card and they still work, just presumably not as quickly as with UHS-II readers.

So there you have it. Well, for now. Flash memory is likely to continue to get faster and cheaper, so eventually SDXC cards will be butting up at the two terabyte limit and some new higher capacity version will appear.

As usual its the third party cards that are far cheaper, the Lexar 64G card being £124 while the Lexar 128G (£284) card is still cheaper than Panasonics 64G V90 card at £350 !

The Panasonic GH5 uses these faster SDXC cards and will benefit from an up and coming firmware taking the camera up to the same 400Mbps as the EVA-1, making it a good “B” camera for interviews.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Sony getting rattled in the USA ?

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After Panasonic announced the EVA-1 camcorder Sony made two announcements to burry the Panasonic news.

Firstly they announced they are working on a full frame sensor ? Fine if you could afford this level of technology, but it will not be anywhere near the $10,000 price mark for this full frame camera.

Then only yesterday announce a $1000 rebate if you buy your FS5 in the USA, thanks Sony Europe ?

Both Canon with the C200 and Panasonic with the EVA-1 have rattled Sony’s cage, but so far only in the USA ? Why ?

This news is good for those of us looking to buy the Panasonic EVA-1 because Panasonic will have to look very hard at the price they charge for the EVA-1 to match the FS5 or indeed beat the FS5 which is $4,749 with the $1000 rebate.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Panasonic EVA-1 “Your Questions Answered”

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Panasonic EVA1 “YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED”

At Cine Gear Expo 2017 in Hollywood, Panasonic previewed the AU-EVA1 cinema camera. Equipped with a newly designed 5.7K Super 35 sensor and positioned between the Panasonic Lumix GH5 4K mirrorless camera and the VariCam LT 4K cinema camera, the EVA1 generated tremendous buzz since being teased at NAB 2017. Compact and lightweight, the AU-EVA1 is tailor-made for handheld shooting, but also well suited for documentaries, commercials, and music videos.

We asked Panasonic Cinema Product Manager, Mitch Gross, some general questions on the EVA1’s target audience, shooting applications, Dual Native ISO, the 5.7K sensor, and more.

MITCH GROSS: I think you’re going to see a lot of people shooting documentary style work with the EVA1 – talking head interviews and B-roll shots in the field. It’s very convenient for that style of shooting. You’re also going to have people who do news shooting, as well as live event type work such as weddings and sports videography. In addition, there will be people who

will want to rig the camera for specific types of remote work, meaning mounting the camera out on a crane, or jib arm. You want it fully featured yet small and lightweight because the bigger your camera is, the bigger crane you would have to use, just like on a Steadicam. Gimbal devices like a [Freefly Systems] Mo ̄VI or a [DJI] Ronin want a fully featured camera but in a small and lightweight package. With EVA1, you get the dual advantage of having great capabilities while being lightweight and small. Same goes for underwater housings, car rigs, or anytime you need to place a camera somewhere where you want a slimmed down unit that won’t get in the way. You still want to have a capable camera, especially with a Super 35 sensor, and the EVA1 provides just that.

MITCH GROSS: Depending on the type of work you do, EVA1 answers a lot of different needs. It is designed to be a versatile machine that you can plug into a lot of different situations. There are people who have been shooting on smaller cameras such as DSLRs or all-in-one camcorders, and they have felt limitations. At the same time, you have other people who have been shooting on large production cameras and they sometimes have need

for a camera that is slimmed down and more portable. What
we wanted to do was build a camera that could sit in-between those spaces where you could essentially rise up from the small cameras where you want more versatility and you don’t have to fight the machine sometimes. Or you could slim down from a bigger camera for projects where a larger system may be too difficult to deal with or simply too expensive for the production. On the little cameras, you can get amazing work out of these tiny machines but because they’re so small, dealing with the controls can become a barrier and you often must devise workarounds. Shooters put up with the workarounds because these small cameras are so convenient to shoot with. We’ve risen the scale of the camera so now you have these high-end features and easier access to controls in a camera that is a more functional size for most shooters. For users of higher level production machines, we’ve tried to be judicious in keeping as much professional functionality as possible into a compact form factor.

MITCH GROSS: The first thing is that people who are shooting with a [Panasonic Lumix] GH5, is that they are shooting with a Micro Four Thirds sensor and EVA1 contains a Super 35 sensor, which gives you a different look and feel. The larger body size
of the camera, the design of the interface, and where the LCD
is located all give you better access to the controls to make adjustments while rolling. With small DSLR cameras, you can’t comfortably change things as you’re rolling in a run-and-gun style and that’s a problem – you need to be able to adjust on the fly.

In addition, we have proper connectors – real XLR audio inputs, full-size HDMI and locking SDI connectors for video outputs. We have a full-fledged camera that’s designed for video production. It has a removable side hand grip with integrated controls. The EVA1 is designed to be held up to your shoulder as opposed

to way out in front of you, or at your waist. Another example of control you have while shooting video are the integrated ND filters. You have a filter wheel that is built into the camera so you

can adjust exposure as you roll – you don’t have to stop and screw on a filter in front of the lens. The overall design of the EVA1 is to make it more comfortable for video production, as opposed to a stills camera that is doing double duty as a video camera.

MITCH GROSS: Panasonic developed a process to read the sensor’s photosites in a fundamentally different way than it’s traditionally done. More information can be extracted without degrading the image. That effectively gives the imager greater sensitivity and separates the signal from the background noise. It’s essentially a different way of reading the camera sensor
and it gives it two different native ISOs or sensitivities. Whereas in all others cameras, you just dial the gain up to get more sensitivity but you get a lot of noise in the image. You can also do that on the EVA1, but if you just switch between the two native ISOs, they’ll look the same as far as the amount of noise. There are two ways that one might likely want to use this. First, you can shoot with zoom lenses when normally you would have to shoot with primes because zoom lenses generally aren’t as

fast. Instead of having to switch prime lenses, you have more versatility while still getting the right exposure. Another way of using Dual Native ISO is the ability to lower your light levels. In shooting with lower light levels, you will save money, time, and you can shoot with more practical lights in your surroundings. That can be for a high-end production or a more modest production where it can be used for savings, or a stylistic choice.

MITCH GROSS: There are three things. When you start with one resolution and you go to a lower resolution, it always improves the resolving power of the final image. When you start with more and get to less, more information comes through. The result is a more finely detailed image. That can be true when you go from a 5.7K sensor to 4K, UHD, 2K, HD, or 720p – all of which are going to be available on EVA1. Second, there’s more color information. At 5.7K resolution, you have more individual examples of red, green, and blue information – all of which enrich the resulting image in whatever resolution you choose to record. Third, in a future firmware update, there will be an option for a RAW data output from the camera to a separate recorder and that will be available with the full 5.7K resolution. All that data will be made available, which can be used in post in various ways, whether
it’s reframing or gathering extra information to manipulate the image. More is more and it gives you greater choices in what you might do with it in the future.

 

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

Panasonic EVA-1… First Thoughts

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Wow…Panasonic bounce back in style after a five year period of not upgrading the AF101 to 4K in 2012.

Lets look at what we know so far…

Finally a super 35mm sensor which should keep noise down to a minimum.

A Canon EF mount allowing those of us who have Canon or Sigma ART glass to get some fantastic shallow depth of field shots and with electronic image stabilization.

4:2:2 10bit is a major upgrade in quality with V-log and V-gamut. The ability to capture accurate colors and rich skin tones is a must for any filmmaker. Like the VariCam lineup of cinema cameras, the EVA1 contains V-Log/V-Gamut capture to deliver high dynamic range and broad colors. V-Log has log curve characteristics that some would say are reminiscent of negative film and V-Gamut delivers a color space even larger than film. The EVA1 will also import the celebrated colorimetry of the VariCam line.

5.7K sensor with no crop in 4K allowing up to 400Mbps recording to SD cards, similar to the GH5 (after a FW upgrade in the summer).

4K outputs in both HDMI and SDI simultaneously great for monitoring and recording to external recorders.

2K recording up to 240 fps slow motion.

It only ships with an LCD, sadly it does not have a viewfinder though you can get a 3rd party EVF, though it does ship with a sunshade.

Timecode in and out for syncing up external sound recorders or multi camera shoots.

Erik Naso from Newsshooter shows off how small the new EVA-1 is.    ©Newsshooter

I love the size of the camcorder Erik Naso (above) demonstrates this nicely, I also like its looks with the sexy red go faster striping taking it away from the boring regimental black look.

So how does this affect the likes of Sony, Canon, JVC and Blackmagic, firstly JVC does not have a camera at this level.

Sony has the FS5 and the FS7 Mk11 the closest spec. wise being the FS7 Mk11. At £7,614 the FS7 Mk11 is £1,400 dearer and does have the advantage of being out first and becoming a camcorder that everyone is now using from broadcast promos to drama and corporate.

Canon have just announced the C200 but the Panasonic is far superior, spec. wise in every way less the auto focus system.

Blackmagic is the only contender to EVA-1 with their URSA mini Pro priced at £4,919 less EVF (extra £1,434). Panasonic claim the EVA-1 is less than £6,200 ($8,000) to compete with the BM URSA mini Pro it would need to be about £5,200 in my opinion.

I think this is going to be a very popular cine camcorder as it meets all the “wants” from most cameramen and women. With a wide range of EVF’s on the market its a shame you are forced into buying one just to shoot in daylight conditions and find critical focus which cant be done on an LCD without a loupe of some kind.

Panasonic Broadcast have finally redressed the balance with EVA-1, personally I think the GH5 has given them a fright and gone all out to produce a cracking super 35mm camcorder that everyone wants !

Panasonic needs to get the price right on this camcorder so when they quote less than $8,000 (£6,200) and your up against the BM URSA mini Pro at £4,919 incl vat, I don’t think you can genuinely afford to climb beyond £5,200 incl vat and lets be honest its also up against the massive sales of the Panasonic GH5 at £2,000 incl vat (with XLR unit) with very similar specs.

For all your video production needs in Scotland, get in touch with Small Video Productions

NEW…The Super 35mm Panasonic EVA1..Less than $8000

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Designed for handheld shooting, the camera is equally suited to documentaries, commercials and music videos. By starting at a higher native resolution, the 5.7K sensor yields a higher resolving image when down sampled to 4K, UHD, 2K and even at 720p. The increased colour information results in a finer, more accurate finished image, enabling the user to capture true cinematic moments.

Compact and lightweight, the AU-EVA1 is tailor-made for handheld shooting, but also well suited for documentaries, advertisements, and music videos. The compact size and new 5.7K sensor mean that the EVA1 fills that gap for a variety of filmmaking applications.

Sensor

  • Super 35
  • 5.7K
  • Dual Native ISO – Panasonic’s method to extract more information from the sensor without degrading the image
  • Advanced Colorimetry

Lens/Image Path

  • Native EF Mount
  • Electronic Image Stabilisation (EIS)
  • IR Cut In/Out (Panasonic claims that “Unique photographic effects and night vision imagery are possible with this control over infrared”
  • Integrated ND Filter Wheel (2/4/6 stops)

Processing

  • 4K60p / 2K up to 240p
  • 4:2:2 10-bit
  • The camera can record in several formats and compression rates. A complete breakdown of recording formats will be available at the time of the EVA1’s release.
  • Video Codec up to 400 Mbps
  • V-log & V-gamut
  • 4K outputs in both HDMI and SDI simultaneously
  • SD Card Recording
  • 5.7K Raw Output to third-party recorders via a future update.
  • Dual native ISO

Other

  • XLR Audio Inputs
  • HDMI & SDI 4K Video Outputs
  • Removable handgrip (for easy mounting on drones, gimbal rigs or jib arms)
  • Timecode in/out
  • LCD sun shade included
  • Compact form factor and lightweight –  1.2kg/42.3 oz. (body only)
  • 6.69“ x 5.31“ x 5.23“ / 17cm x 13.5cm x 13.3cm (LxHxW)
Our compact and lightweight cinema camera, the AU-EVA1 contains a newly designed 5.7K Super 35mm-sized sensor for capturing true cinematic images. By starting at a higher native resolution, the 5.7K sensor yields a higher resolving image when down sampled to 4K, UHD, 2K, and even 720p. The increased colour information results in a finer, more accurate finished image.

Night city square in Krakow, Poland

The EVA1 includes dual native ISO like the VariCam 35, VariCam LT and VariCam Pure. Utilising a process that allows the sensor to be read in a fundamentally different way, dual native ISO extracts more information from the sensor without degrading the image. This results in a camera that can switch from a standard sensitivity to a high sensitivity without an increase in noise, or other artifacts. Dual native ISO is allowing cinematographers to use less light on set, saving time and money, as well as allowing for a great variety of artistic choices.

The ability to capture accurate colours and rich skin tones is a must for any filmmaker. Like the VariCam lineup of cinema cameras, the EVA1 contains V-Log/V-Gamut capture to deliver high dynamic range and broad colours. V-Log has log curve characteristics that are somewhat reminiscent of negative film and V-Gamut delivers a colour space even larger than film. The EVA1 will also import the celebrated colourimetry of the VariCam line.

Weighing only 1.2Kg (body-only) with a compact form factor (17cm x  13.5cm x 13.3cm) and a removable handgrip, EVA1 can be used for efficient handheld shooting applications and can also be mounted on a drone, gimbal rig, or jib arm for complex yet smooth camera moves. The camera is therfore tailor-made for handheld shooting, but also well suited for documentaries, commercials, and music videos.

The EVA1 records to readily-available, lower-cost SD cards. The camera can record in several formats and compression rates, and offers up to 10-bit 422, even in 4K. A complete breakdown of recording formats will be available at the time of the EVA1’s release.

The camera utilises a native EF-mount, giving shooters access to the broad EF lens ecosystem, including dozens of cinema-style prime and zoom lenses from numerous manufacturers. Electronic Image Stabilisation (EIS) is employed to compensate for camera shake and blurring, which will help smooth out handheld or shoulder-mount shots on documentary or run-and-gun projects. Behind the lens mount, an integrated ND filter wheel in 2, 4, and 6 stops allows for precise exposure control. The EVA1 also allows the IR Cut filter to be swung out of the path to the sensor at the push of a button. Unique photographic effects and night vision imagery are possible with this control over infrared.

As a professional video production tool, the EVA1 offers dual balanced XLR audio inputs and 4K-capable video outputs in both HDMI and SDI.

Here is a video from the boys at Cinema 5D

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