Panasonic AG-AF101 User Review (20mins)

Categories: Miscellaneous 9 Comments

[xr_video id="d5ea7a1cb8284daf8356191586b769b1" size="md"]

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9 comments on this post

  1. Scott Cassie says:

    As always a great video review, hail HD Warrior.

  2. petejohn says:

    I agree. A genuine presentation without a sales pitch. Users always present the best reviews. From what I surmise the AF101 needs to be on a tripod and also needs a variety of accessories for best results. I reckon I can still near match a lot of this work with a humble XHA1 and a Letus (with all the accessories as well.) The difference being the crispness of the images that you presented. I dunno. Perhaps it’s worth taking a loan for a Sony F3 kit or hanging out for their new NXCAM. All I see with the AF101 is a camera without a need for a 35mm adaptor. Anyway they’re my immediate thoughts without too much reflection.

  3. Douglas Gibbons says:

    Brilliant review and so helpful. Bravo to you Philip Johnston! I will now be placing my order for the AF 101.

  4. Great review Philip. Looking forward to using one soon.

  5. Greg.Ruzik says:

    Thx for Your work Philip, great review!

  6. Graham Vedmore says:

    Really good review. I’ve always been a Panasonic fan after starting off with Sony in 1992 I bought two AG100s in 2003 and then two HVX200s in 2007. The 200s had their faults and flaws like the poxy little screen monitor but as Rick Young says they had the ability to produce ‘better than you thought footage’ when you got back to the studio.
    I want a 101 but I will probably buy the second version as I wish to see how they perform for the long haul. With adaptors they should accommodate any lens so it should be possible to put the Sony-Zeiss lenses for the Sony 850 stills camera on it. This will simplify gear “luggability” the alternative being to get a bigger woman.
    Changing lenses at an event could spell disaster as you don’t know what’s going to fly in, particularly in the summer, by way of dirt and dust.
    The other thing with wide aperture shallow depth of field is getting the difference right between gradual depth of field change and simply having blobs of out of focus things. Still I suppose we’re at the start of the 101 saga. Look forward to more to come.
    Many thanks

  7. Nicely done Philip! Thanks for your hard work.

    My AF-100 hasn’t arrived yet. While I wait, I’ve been pondering lens choices for the camera. I have come to the conclusion that I really should buy all cine-style PL lenses. I avoided the whole DSLR video craze, so I’m lucky in that I don’t have a lot of money invested in a pile of stills lenses and can start from scratch.
    I get what you’re saying about how the AF makes you change how you think and work. I understand that I should have a prime or two in my kit, and maybe a specialty lens like that amazing Voigtlander…great for dark interiors, night exteriors or product shots. But my thought is, why can’t I get the same look without having to change how I’m used to working? Wouldn’t a short, fast zoom shooting wide-open give me almost the same look as a prime at a similar focal length and f-stop? I would think it would be much more efficient to have a zoom that I can leave on the camera most of the time for b-roll or changing up the focal length on the fly during an interview without having to change lenses or re-setting the camera position. My concern is that I’ll actually get bogged down with lens changes and won’t be as productive in the field…and there doesn’t seem to be enough hours in the day as it is!
    Anyway, I think your auntie was sweet and good sport for helping you out. And she even cooked for you boys! Remember her at Christmas!
    Cheers-John

  8. Daniel says:

    Interesting review and great comments, but no mension of power solutions. We here at Hawk-woods as you may already know design solutions for powering your pro kit. We have already supplied dummy batteries to enable AF101 users to greatly increase the running time of the camera and the facility to power other devices alongside the camera. Check out the website.

    Regards

    Daniel

  9. bryan azzopardy says:

    I want to love this camera but I’m worried that in real life filming situations ( weddings + events) it will slow you down as you will not have too much time for lens changes etc.
    I’m trying to decide between this and a Sony Ex1r which already has a proven track record and it seems still has a better picture quality although with the shallow depth of field option.

    ANY VIEWS which camera would be best?

    Bryan

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